Useful things to know

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What should I expect from working with a conservator?

At your appointment, we will look at the pieces together and discuss your goals, such as display in your home or long term storage to give to grandchildren in the future.  We will discuss the differences between preservation, restoration and conservation. This initial, in studio, verbal consultation is free of charge. If you decide to continue, you will leave your textiles at the studio where they will be examined thoroughly, including necessary testing, to give an accurate estimate and write a treatment proposal. If you like the proposal, you will sign for approval and send a deposit.  Final payment is due when the project is completed. 

How much is it worth?

You are the curator of your collection. The cost of conservation treatment is not a reflection of the market value. It may cost more to conserve and restore than the textile will bring at auction. You will need to determine if you want conservation based on the historical, emotional, or sentimental impact the textile has on your collection or family. It is a conflict of interest for a conservator to base the cost of treatment on the value of the object. An estimate is based on time and materials required.

Having said that, if you need a referral for an appraiser for insurance purposes, one can easily be provided.

Where can I learn more about caring for my textile?

The American Institute for Conservation is an organization that supports the conservation professional community and provides information for the public. This page of their website is a good place to start if you would like to learn more about the care of your collection or family heirlooms. 

https://learning.culturalheritage.org/